The Shelf Life Advice Quick Reference Guide has answers about refrigerated unopened and opened foods. To receive your copy, type your email address in the box below and click "Sign Up".

Halloween Treats Even Parents Will Love

HalloweenWhat a dilemma! You don’t want to contribute to the junk food or childhood obesity problems now rampant in the U.S., but you have to hand out something kids will consider a treat and something their parents will allow them to eat.  Here are some suggestions:

Tailgating: How to Do It Right

tailgatingThe word "tailgate" has several different meanings including the one we're using here: the custom of picnicking before or after an athletic event, concert, or race. This type of event originated in the American South, probably with college football, more than 100 years ago. Today, it's spread to many other team sports (such as basketball and soccer) as well as popular concerts. 


Tailgating is in full swing now that the college football season is upon us. The main activity at these events is eating and sharing food with fellow football fans (even those supporting rival teams).  Therefore, Shelf Life Advice just had to cover this social and culinary phenomenon. We have excellent advice to keep you eating well and safely while socializing in the great outdoors. Below, you'll also find links to several sites about tailgating preparations and recipes.

Some Like It Hot, Some Like It Cold—Either Way, Here’s How to Keep Home-made School Lunches Safe and Tasty

Lunch BoxDiane laughs as she recalls carrying a peanut butter and jelly sandwich to school every day for some eight years:  “It was the only meal my mother considered safe to consume after being unrefrigerated all morning.” Today, we know that safety doesn’t require such monotony.  However, the challenge remains—how to pack nutritious, delicious meals that will remain uncontaminated even if they spend all morning on a coatroom floor.


Perishable foods (those that need to be kept hot or cold) must not be left in what food scientists call the “danger zone” (40°-140°F; 4°-60°C)  for more than two hours. Bacteria and other pathogens that can contaminate foods and cause illness grow rapidly in that temperature range.  Children’s lunches, if left unrefrigerated for about four hours, must contain only shelf-stable items, or parents must learn a few techniques for keeping hot food hot and cold food cold. (These tips will also come in handy when adults prepare their own portable lunches.)

BYOB: It Also Means "Bring your own bag."

grocery bagThe movement to ban those flimsy thow-away plastic grocery bags has recently come to Chicago and one of it's neigboring suberbs, Evanston. I have  mixed feelings about this required change in my bagging habits.

Syndicate content

You must be logged in to post a comment or question.

Sign In or Register for free.