The Shelf Life Advice Quick Reference Guide has answers about refrigerated unopened and opened foods. To receive your copy, type your email address in the box below and click "Sign Up".

Ten Exotic Fruits: Novel Treats to Drink and Eat

Buddha's HandEver eaten a  Buddha's hand? No?  How about a custard apple, rambutan, yumberry, or dragon fruit?  These are  just a few among many strange-looking but tasty exotic fruits. Though not as bizarre (or cruel) as the people-eating plant in the musical Little Shop of Horrors, they are about as odd as their names imply.  Some are beautiful and some as ugly as ugli-fruit (a grapefruit hybrid). Read on to see photos of ten obscure exotic fruits, learn more about these products, and find out where they can be purchased.

Ethylene and Produce: Friends or Foes?

applesBuying a lot of fresh fruits and vegetables these days?  Then it's well worth knowing something about ethylene. "What's ethylene?" some may ask.  It's a plant hormone that fruits and vegetables produce naturally as they ripen.  Reducing exposure to ethylene slows the natural ripening, thereby extending produce shelf life.  The problem is that, like many gases, it's sneaky--invisible and odorless.  Nevertheless, you can infer its presence and control it to some extent.

Tips on Making Food Appealing, Food Safety and BPA (again)

salmon patty with sour creamThe first two Q/As below are about good food but not in the sense of nutrition; they're about good food meaning the person eating it does so with pleasure and enthusiasm. The third and fourth Q/As are about developing a protective sense as to what stores offer that might be a health risk--food possibly contaminated by temperature abuse or store receipts that might get BPA on your hands.

 

A Food App You're Apt to Like; A Brand-New Invention for Getting Shelf-Life Information

Foodkeeper appFinding better ways to help consumers figure out how long their edible purchases will last is an ongoing priority.  Recently, the U.S. government and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have been working together on the matter, and they've come up with an app called Foodkeeper with shelf life information on some 400 products including meat, poultry, seafood, dairy products, and produce. Also for shelf-life answers, chemists at MIT have developed an inexpensive portable sensor that can detect gases produced by decaying meat; it tells consumers whether to eat that chicken or discard it.  Let's learn more about both of these projects.

Syndicate content
 
 

You must be logged in to post a comment or question.

Sign In or Register for free.