The Shelf Life Advice Quick Reference Guide has answers about refrigerated unopened and opened foods. To receive your copy, type your email address in the box below and click "Sign Up".

Crock Pot Cooking Tips for that Ideal Winter Dinner

Crockpot Crock pot cooking becomes much more popular in the wintertime. I think that people definitely eat more in the winter, and hot, warming foods are favorites. Foods with a lot of liquid, steam and a pleasant aroma) seem to have extra appeal. Maybe it’s because of the warmth that the liquid (I’m thinking of a bowl of soup) can give to your body as it’s consumed. The steam from the food also warms up the air around the cooker, the bowl, and the entire room.

Going Away for All or Part of the Winter? Prepare Your Kitchen for your Absence

Fridge

If you’re going to be vacationing away from home for a few weeks or even months, lucky you!  But you won’t feel so lucky if you come home to a smelly or germ-laden refrigerator and a freezer with a sticky mess of melted ice cream. When considering the proper way to prepare your kitchen for your absence, consider your answers to these questions:

Yikes! The Turkey Is Done, But the Guests Are Delayed! How Do I Keep My Thanksgiving Dinner Warm?

Woman serving Thanksgiving TurkeyThe turkey is done, but where are the guests? Winter weather and too much traffic can slow down cars and planes. And then there are those who live around the corner from you but are chronically late for everything. Don’t invite them next year. Find prompter friends. But that doesn’t solve this year’s problem: how to keep food at a safe and appetizing temperature while waiting for dilatory diners. This article will cover holding techniques used by experts.  But first, some basics about food safety and the definition of a cooked turkey.

Using a Turkey Fryer: Tips and Warnings

Turkey FryerThere have been a lot of advancements in turkey fryers over the years, and I think that in general, the newer fryers are much safer than the older, open-pot, open-flame models. At least one manufacturer offers an oil-free turkey fryer (www.masterbuilt.com), which looks a lot more like a smoker than a fryer to me, but it must be safer than the oil-filled alternative!

 

Electric turkey fryers have the advantage of no open flame to possibly ignite the oil.  This is why many can be used indoors. Also, the temperature controls on an inexpensive electric-powered home fryer are more likely to be automated than on the gas version. Finally, the indoor turkey fryers can be used for conveniently frying other foods plus many can be used for steaming too. One negative aspect of frying indoors is the odor and airborne oil particles that invade your home.

Syndicate content
 
 

You must be logged in to post a comment or question.

Sign In or Register for free.